Girls For Breakfast

I’m standing on top of the water tower behind my house, thinking about my death and the inevitable bronze statue the graduating class will erect in my memory.

The amount of times I thought “is this really how boys think?” while reading this YA novel was probably staggering.  Of course, this is fiction, from another time zone and – with the Korean background of the main character – laced with race-connected details. And yet. Really?

The reader follows Korean-American Nick Parker from eight to eighteen, more or less. He’s at his graduation day, hiding away and looking back on his desperate need for popularity, girls, friendships and fitting in.

Nick’s discovery at a certain age that he is a banana, that he may think himself as white but definitely isn’t viewed as such, keeps Girls For Breakfast from becoming another navel gazing coming of age story. He doesn’t just has to deal with growing up, he has the whole different race thing going on, without his consent.

Girls For Breakfast, David Yoo, Random House Children’s Books 2005

Author: vanferdinandus

I'm a copy writer and a journalist, and my life evolves around reading, creating and writing. I watch a lot and read a lot, and sometimes I review it as well.