Toni Erdmann

162 min.

162 minuten van mijn leven die ik nooit meer terug zal krijgen. Was het zo erg? Ach, niet helemaal, maar wel genoeg om er spijt van te hebben.

toni erdmann posterDe tijd moet vast gebruikt worden om vast te leggen dat de relatie tussen vader en dochter niet normaal zijn. Vader is een vreemde vogel met grappen die lang niet altijd grappig zijn, dochter is een zakenvrouw. Waarom ze echter een licht-sociaal-onhandige vrouw is – buiten zo’n vader om – wordt niet uitgelegd. Zij mag sowieso de motivatie en inspiratie zijn van vader, maar krijgt zelf niet veel verder de ruimte dan ‘denkt alleen aan werk’.

Ok√©, misschien is dat omdat het zijn film is, misschien zoek ik balans waar die niet is. Maar ook Winfried (de film legt het wel uit) laat weinig zien waardoor de kijker sympathie voor hem kan voelen, of op z’n minst begrijpen waarom hij op deze manier door het leven gaat. Nu is hij weinig meer dan de clown die hij uithangt, en clowns worden snel vervelend.

Ik hoop dat die arme Ines de controle over haar leven weer terug heeft gekregen.

Toni Erdmann, Missing Link Films 2016

 

Parasite

132 min.

As is known by now; I’m not that impressed by lyrical reviews. If the words ‘needs an Oscar!’ pass by, I roll with my eyes. There’s two reasons I still went to go see Parasite in theaters: I was curious, and I had a free ticket.

parasite posterNow I’ve watched it and don’t know how to review it without giving the story away. But honestly, wow. Parasite moves through different genres and scores with every one of them. It doesn’t have to be a commentary about rich versus poor, about housing and loans; the images are there and clear enough.

So yes, it’s a story about a poor family that worms its way into the heart of a very rich family. Yes, you’re very probably going to have to read subtitles as well (unless you know Korean). But holy heck, what did I just watch?

It’s beautiful and sharp and cheeky, until it isn’t. It’s daunting, until it turns into something worse. It’s over two hours and only very few times that I felt like checking the time remaining, because you have to pay attention. Or rather, you want to. And in some way I feel like watching it again already – let me go back to the family.

Parasite, Neon 2019

 

 

I Am Mother

113 min.

When you first critique lands about ten minutes in, it’s hard to not view a film without bias. Why is everyone involved white, even the people in the ‘old-timey’ videos the main character views?

I Am Mother posterThen there’s the non-nuanced use of the soundtrack. A good soundtrack builds upon the scene, sharpens the emotions you are already feeling. In this case we got THINGS ARE SCARY pressed upon you while things weren’t all that scary. Or emotional. And lights flickering with no reason don’t mean that we’re worried either, just that we want an explanation about wiring suddenly being faulty when we’re looking for someone.

Is there anything nice to be said about this film? Not really – maybe that with small tweaks it could at least be a commentary on sovereign AI and its relationship with humanity, but that’s been done before – and better – as well. Even the explanation of the things happening is extremely unclear – did I nod off somewhere along the almost two hour ride?

So all in all, it’s just not much of anything. If someone’s mid-parting is the thing I’m irked about most, it doesn’t say any good about the plot. You can’t replace it with music bits either, nor flickering lights.

Good thing about all this is that at least it’s an utterly disbelieving dystopia: more sensible humans would have given up before any AI could get involved.

I Am Mother, Netflix 2019

 

The Au Pair

We have no photographs of our early days, Danny and I.

Right up my alley, this one. Family secrets, a tinge of the supernatural and people using lipstick to write on mirrors.

After a death in the family, Seraphine discovers a photograph that makes her doubt her family history. She’s always felt different (isn’t that how it always starts?), and now feels like she can finally turn that feeling into something solid.

Good thing she still lives in her family home and plenty of hints are quite easily found. Is it witches, fairies, or just the cute little villagers that had always enjoyed a good gossip about the weirdos in Summerbourne house?

We are strung along just a tad too long, but the decorations along the way are fun enough to not be very disgruntled about it. In less than 300 pages Emma Rous sets up an entertaining tent with solid poles keeping up a well-set story. If there would have been more room for the supernatural, I would have given it an extra star.

The Au Pair, Emma Rous, Penguin Random House 2018