Fire and Blood

The maesters of the Citadel who keep the histories of Westeros have used Aegon’s conquest as their touchstone for the past three hundred years.

Are you in need of more Westeros now the TV-show is so close to ending and the book series it might be based on might never finish? Do you love dragons and politics in your fantasy? Boy, do I’ve got a recommendation for you. For those that are looking for fantasy and just grabbed the newest book your library had on offer? Hm-mweh.

George R.R. Martin has always been a bit Tolkien-light when it comes to his descriptions over show-don’t-tell. Fire & Blood is Martin gathering all those descriptions he probably ever used to spend time on one Westeros family: Targaryen (yes, I know we can discuss if they’re a Westeros family). Remember from the Bible those family trees lists that went on forever? That’s Fire & Blood, just with more descriptions added of how people look and from time to time how people (brutally) died in one of the many fights and wars.

Is that a bad thing? That depends on what you want from this book. This isn’t an epic telling; it’s closer to an encyclopedia with some prose added (and repetitive at that; there really couldn’t have been more side steps to other countries and families instead of hearing how another sibling-pair marries each other?). Do you just want more of Martin’s Westeros (I did)? This will work for you, as long as you don’t read it too much in one go – mentioned repetitions will really start to show.  And those dragons? Well, they’re … pretty?

Fire & Blood, George R.R. Martin, Penguin Random House 2018

DNF

I’m still learning not to feel bad when I don’t finish a book. Who am I reading it for, what will change in my life if I do or do not finish it? The majority of my reading is for pleasure, so why carry on doing something that doesn’t provide it?

My recent DNF (did not finish) were:

Red Birds by Mohammed Hanif – honestly, I don’t know why I still borrow books that call themselves comedy, satire, or have blurbs about hilarious they are;
Milkman by Anna Burns – an anonymous stream of conscience with no head or tails. I like PLOT;
The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett by Chelsea Sedoti – okay, maybe you should expect a bit less from YA, but I don’t care for slutshaming from anyone, especially not a Not Like Other People protagonist.
Oh well, I’ve already read 27 books this year, duds must show up.

Witches of New York

In the dusky haze of evening a ruddy-cheeked newsboy strode along Fifth Avenue proclaiming the future.

Remember The Rules of Magic? I’ve got a similar book-from-the-nineties-feeling with this one. Or maybe it’s just the nineties that make me remember the nineties? This story doesn’t even play out in the nineties, so we might never know. On to witches!

This is New York in the nineteenth century, which certainly was part of the appeal for me as well, and luckily for me does Ami McKay spend time on giving the city room in her story as well. It’s enough of another world from the New York city we know (through media and fiction), that a magical element seems to fit almost right in.

The three main characters are quite charming as well, even though I would have enjoyed learning more about the older two. There’s also something to say about how the author decides to completely commit to magic instead of keeping the implication and illusion of it, but it doesn’t sour the story of the three women. All in all, like the book mentioned in the first paragraph – none of this is mind-blowing and groundbreaking – but it is sweet and easily enjoyable.

Witches of New York, Ami McKay, Alfred A. Knopf 2016

La casa de las flores

13 x 30 min.

Nog niet genoeg drama in je leven? Zeker niet als het in de vorm van een telenovela is? Ik werk me langzaam door het Spaanstalige aanbod van Netflix, en na Las Chicas del Cable kwam ik terecht bij La Casa de las flores oftewel Het huis van bloemen/The House of Flowers. U raadt het misschien al: deze keer speelt het drama zich af in een bloemenwinkel.

la_casa_de_las_flores_posterDeze keer volg je een familie die op het eerste oog traditioneel, hecht en gelukkig is. Dat eerste oog houdt het niet lang vol, maar het imago van zowel de familie als de winkel is heel belangrijk, dus er wordt in allerlei bochten gedraaid en gevouwen om alles binnenhuis te houden. Dat lukt sommige familieleden íets beter dan anderen.

Dit is gemaakt voor (leed)vermaak; geen van de karakters hebben veel ruimte om zich te bewijzen als iets anders dan een karikatuur, en de ontwikkelingen volgen zich zo snel op dat je bijna een rooster bij moet houden om te zien waar wie nu weer in vastgeraakt is. Maar niets mis met vermaak, en dit is zo af en toe van het niveau kakelen. De boeketten steken er af en toe bleekjes bij af.

La casa de las flores, Netflix 2018

 

The Bone Clocks

I fling open my bedroom curtains, and there’s the thirsty sky and the wide river full of ships and boats and stuff, but I’m already thinking of Vinny’s chocolaty eyes, shampoo down Vinny’s back, beads of sweat on Vinny’s shoulders, and Vinny’s sly laugh and, God, I wish I was waking up at Vinny’s place in Peacock Street and not in my own stupid bedroom.

Even though his motives are getting more familiar with every book you read by him – does this man love time travel and parallel worlds – I can’t ignore a David Mitchell offering.

As per usual, there’s seemingly random people connected in seemingly random ways, throughout time and space on earth. It all starts on the thin line between ‘Is there something out there’/people’s delusions, but – as Mitchell does – it erupts into some very fantastic science fiction closer to the ending. Don’t bother with this story if you prefer your stories doubting, this author likes to jump around over that line.

But there’s just something about how he creates his characters and their surroundings that makes me want to follow along. So, yes, carry on, doing what you do. For the time travel/’consider this afterlife’/’it’s all connected’ fans, you can’t go wrong with this author.

The Bone Clocks, David Mitchell, Alfred A. Knopf 2014

Sucker Punch

110 min.

Met sommige films/boeken (ik houd het meestal niet lang genoeg vol bij een slechte TV-serie) is er gewoon al voorpret over de review. Potverdikkeme, wat is Sucker Punch een sneu zooitje in zeventien tinten groen en grijs.

Sucker-Punch-posterHet maakt me niet eens zo erg uit dat er geen plot is, en dat wat doet alsof het plot is, compleet onlogisch is. Hey, dat gebeurt wel vaker. Maar gewoon helemaal niks van deze film klopt? Meisje gaat door iets traumatisch en wordt door een gemeen familielid naar een gesloten kliniek gebracht (ook al blijkt ze oud genoeg om daar zelf over te kunnen beslissen?). In die kliniek zijn alleen maar mooie, dunne vrouwen van haar leeftijd, en die dansen voor vieze oude rijkelui. Oké? Máár! Tijdens dat dansen hallucineren ze, of volgen we de jonge vrouwen hun hoofden in, en verzamelen ze in kleine, infantiliserende pakjes, voorwerpen waarmee ze kunnen ontsnappen. Het dansen wordt nooit getoond, maar iedereen is er schijnbaar vreselijk van onder de indruk.

Dit alles in enkele tinten groen en grijs, met veel pruillipjes, koosnaampjes en de hele Sexy Halloween-catalogus. Maar maak je geen zorgen, man-in-charge Zack Snyder vond het een zeer feministisch project. Waarom is onduidelijk.

Enige dat enigszins de moeite waard was? De soundtrack, en die is vast online ergens gratis te vinden.

Sucker Punch, Warner Brothers 2011

Stay with Me

I must leave this city today and come to you.

I typed and deleted the start of this blog for about four times. It’s an impressive story, a frustrating one, not a happy one but a hopeful one? Here’s me scoring high on cliché bingo.

So, okay. Stay with Me is about a Nigerian couple that can’t conceive and because offspring is very important, is offered (‘offered’) a second wife to make sure offspring does happen. But this is liking saying Lord of the Rings is about some rings, there’s much more to it.

It’s not just a slice of life, it’s a slice of culture. It’s for everyone who isn’t familiar with Nigeria and Nigerians, a look behind the scenes. Yes, we all have relationships and romances, but how, why, and in what way? What sacrifices are desired (by the partners, their families, their surroundings), and who are you if you’re not parents of a child/children?

I was warned beforehand that the subject could get pretty heavy, and there have been times I cursed out outdated ideas and the people still clinging to them. But as an anthropological view, as a psychological view, and to freaking root for Yejide.. this story has a strong pull.

Stay with Me, Ayobami Adebayo, Alfred A. Knopf 2017