Prince of Egypt

99 min.

A shorter animation, also to be found on Netflix, and possibly with an ever better soundtrack than that of my previous watched film, but it would be a close call.

I watched Prince of Egypt before, possibly even in the cinema. I can remember it being an Event and through the years it’s always (online) been a classic or at least the favourite of a generation. To watch it with older eyes is a risk, but I did it.

It still works. The animation is more beautiful than the C+P of today’s productions, the soundtrack is intense, the story is – even for heathens like me – appealing. I honestly don’t understand why the Vatican didn’t finance studios to do many biblical stories like this; I wonder if people turned to Christianity after watching Prince of Egypt.

Anyway, just telling you it won’t disappoint. I’m sure you still know the lines of When You Believe.

Princess Mononoke

133 min.

Princess Mononoke has it all: horror, fantasy, beautiful shots, an epic quest and a sincere romance. Why didn’t I watch this sooner? I mean – I could have: it’s from 1997.

Probably because – and I know it’s risky to admit this – I like the idea of Studio Ghibli films more than the products. Sometimes it’s just too long, too vague, beauty over substance. It’s probably telling that one of the more kiddie ones caught my fancy most.

But Princess Mononoke pulls out of the stops: a cursed prince has to save his village (probably the world) from human evilry influencing nature and turning animals into demons. There’s a wolf princess but human, talking swines and weird little forest creatures that are simultaneously adorable and terrifying. The Life Lessons come at you fast, but not in the sanctimonious Hollywood way: what kind of person would you be if you weren’t touched by the fight of nature versus destruction?

I’ll admit that I still took a few short breaks, but this time it was more about being overwhelmed than suffering my short attention span.

Monster Hunter: Legends of the Guild

58 min.

I almost definitely picked this film because it was just two minutes short of an hour. Okay, I’m always up for trying something animated, but a film that’s called Monster Hunter and created by CAPCOM (so probably based on a game)? Let’s not expect too much.

It turns out to be a very sanitised version of a Hollywood fantasy (no blood, dancing around violence and maiming, no naked boobs). Except for the statistician monster hunter. And a talking cat, and fun looking monsters – whom I rooted harder for than any human character.

It’s clear that I out-aged the demographic for this, but the potential is there. Right now it’s just cheap (looking) Saturday morning entertainment for cool kiddos, but imagine if the people behind Witcher ran with it. Or a young Tim Burton. You might have to see to see it.

Crip Camp

100 min.

First documentary of the month. An uncomfortable one because really; did anything change in how society handles disabled people in the past fifty years?

Crip Camp is about Camp Jened, but so much more. About the American government lacking in viewing disableds as citizens instead of their disability. They fight (for) laws, but first and foremost for the right of a multi-dimensional life.

The documentary is completely American focused, connecting to civil rights, racism and sexism. That also makes it easy to pretend it’s a local thing, but of course we know better.

That leaves Crip Camp as a reminder of how much change still has to happen to give disabled citizens the room in society they deserve.

Und morgen die ganze Welt

111 min.

Dat is two out of two voor Duitstalige films. Deze laat minder vragen achter, meer frustraties. Nee, geweld moet je niet met geweld beantwoorden, maar hoe anders bevecht je Nazi’s en hun gedachtengoed?

Luisa is nieuw bij een antifa-beweging, maar wordt al snel meegesleurd in grotere, aggressievere bewegingen. Waarom wordt nooit heel duidelijk, dat dit niet het gewenste resultaat (van de beweging en van haar) oplevert wel.

In een ruime twee uur zie je dat goede bedoelingen naar hel leiden, bijna iedereen machteloos is en mensen altijd erger kunnen. Daar zit je met je goede gedrag, want Luisa maar ook de andere karakters zijn leeg genoeg om jezelf in hun schoenen te plaatsen.

Joy

109 min.

I challenged myself to watch a film every day in November. Expect a lot of film posts.

A warning beforehand, this film shows animal abuse and let’s you listen to rape. In case you felt like the title would give you a happy story.

Joy leaves you with questions, although you know the answers to most of them. It’s a surprise that nothing sentimental is added for once: no room for sentimentality with illegal Nigerian sex workers in Austria. Especially not when there’s debt involved. Joy’s one nice decision (taking a younger woman under her wing) backfires, showing there’s no room for niceties.

It’s near the ending where the questions are left unanswered: what do these actions stand for? What is she doing? With this, Joy ends (not completes!) an all too familiar story (immigration for the people back home) on an eerie, unfamiliar note.

The Hater

136 min.

Very shortly put you could say this is about a young man being unable to deal with rejection.

Tomasz doesn’t turn to complaining to friends of family – he doesn’t have either. Instead he puts all his energy into his new job: influencing (social) media for the highest bidder.

This gets personal when he can get to those who rejected him. The horrors of successful online hate campaigns follow.

Main actor Maciej Musialowski manages to look the sociopath without laying in on too thick, but more about his (original) motivations would have made all this even more scarier and clean cut. Or maybe I’m just too attached to getting questions answered (theme of the month?). Maybe some people are fueled by revenge and chaos and nothing more, turning The Hater (original title is Polish) into a “humans are the monsters”-thriller.

A Good Liar

109 min.

Zo’n verhaal waarvan je al snel hoopt dat het af gaat lopen zoals je weet dat het af moet lopen, maar stel je voor dat je wel een ouderwets, outdated verhaal hebt gevonden en met de frustraties achterblijft.

Spoiler: gelukkig loopt het ook zo af. Al neemt de film er wel de tijd voor.

Het leeuwendeel van de film is het opzetten en volgen van de relatie tussen Roy en Betty. Twee senioren die toch nog iets moois bij elkaar vinden, al is dat wel nogal ongebalanceerd: Roy weet dat Betty miljonair is, Betty heeft genoeg aan gezelschap.

Als zijplotje wordt gedemonstreerd dat Roy wel vaker weet waar de centjes zitten, maar is hij dan alleen met Betty voor haar geld? Verdulleme.

De film is dan vooral een demonstratie van Mirren en McKellan in dialoog: heel de clue wordt met dik-hout-zaagt-men-planken neergegooid en gaat te lang door. Ja ja jeetje wat erg allemaal, maar eigenlijk te laat om impact te hebben. Ook wraakfilms hebben een goede balans nodig.

The Jane Austen Book Club

106 min.

Can I still call it contemporary when the film is fourteen years old – anyway it’s “story is based in the same time it’s been filmed”. Not changing the tag, that’s way too long.

They don’t make films like these anymore: wholesome without looking and feeling plastic. Yes, you can see everything coming from a mile away, but it still seems genuine (and all quite brown-ish, but that might just have been the 2010s). It’s also super easily-written sequel material, but I guess there’s no interest for book-focused romances in the 2020s (2030s?).

Female friends at different stages of their (romantic) lives come together for a book club. Solely for Jane Austen books, yes indeed. Time is divided pretty evenly between the four main characters, and none of the story lines are horrible and/or boring.

It all leads to an end with a dopey smile: look at books making things better. Honestly Netflix; I’ll write the sequel for you if the original author doesn’t want to.

Wish Dragon

98 min.

Also known by Aladdin or any other story involving a genie and/or three wishes. Even ‘it’s not laugh, I just want her attention through wealth’ is used. It’s not a bad film, it’s just impressively mediocre.

This time the story is set in a contemporary Asian city and the princess is a young celebrity. She and Din grew up together before her father moved them to have a better chance at life. Meanwhile Din is struggling to get by and basically working to make enough money so he can meet Li Na on “her level”.

Even the genie, this time a wish dragon, paints by numbers. First he’s snotty, than confused, than finally learns that there’s more to life. He’s well-created and okay-ish voiced but – meh. A lot more of the myth(s) behind it would have elevated it to something more; now the entire film is nothing more than the uninspired decision for a rainy Sunday during which we have to slightly entertain the kids until dinner.