Hoogste tijd

De gong slaat drie keer, langzaam dooft het licht, en met het zachte ruisen van het doek verspreidt zich de muffe geur van kunstmatig leven.

Heb ik zowaar toch eens een Nederlandse auteur gelezen. Een Auteur, zelfs. Laat ik er nu niet te veel aantillen – het blijkt dat ik ‘m al eerder heb gelezen. Al was dat non-fictie.

Maar wat vond ik er dan van? Ja, jeetje. Met een Auteur lees je niet alleen zijn verhaal en zijn stijl, je leest de meningen van anderen en hang daar (misschien wel) je verwachtingen aan. Als ik mij goed kan herinneren is deze mij eens aangeraden door een Nederlands docent om een ‘On-Mulisch-achtige’ Mulisch te lezen. Misschien vond ik het wel interessant omdat het over theater en acteren ging.

Heel kort gezegd gaat het over een oude man met een verleden in het theater die opgezocht wordt om (nog één keer) een rol te spelen. Iets minder kort gezegd betekent dat de lezer de oude man volgt, de rol die hij speelt, en overpeinzingen die door verschillende toneelstukken en verledens behelzen.

Dat is wat het verhaal voor mij interessant maakte, maar zeker ook – naar het einde toe – verwarrend. Zijn het hallucinaties, is het niet meer dan een observatie dat bij goed acteren de acteur verandert in/besmet raakt met degene die hij/zij speelt? Is het leven één groot toneelstuk?

Niet elke plotlijn is even makkelijk te verteren, en sommige opmerkingen zijn op z’n minst ‘ouderwets’, maar het lichtvervreemde in combinatie met een Amsterdam die tegenwoordig compleet verdwenen lijkt – ja, ik vond het wel een ervaring.

Hoogste Tijd, Harry Mulisch, Bezige Bij 1985

Toni Erdmann

162 min.

162 minuten van mijn leven die ik nooit meer terug zal krijgen. Was het zo erg? Ach, niet helemaal, maar wel genoeg om er spijt van te hebben.

toni erdmann posterDe tijd moet vast gebruikt worden om vast te leggen dat de relatie tussen vader en dochter niet normaal zijn. Vader is een vreemde vogel met grappen die lang niet altijd grappig zijn, dochter is een zakenvrouw. Waarom ze echter een licht-sociaal-onhandige vrouw is – buiten zo’n vader om – wordt niet uitgelegd. Zij mag sowieso de motivatie en inspiratie zijn van vader, maar krijgt zelf niet veel verder de ruimte dan ‘denkt alleen aan werk’.

Oké, misschien is dat omdat het zijn film is, misschien zoek ik balans waar die niet is. Maar ook Winfried (de film legt het wel uit) laat weinig zien waardoor de kijker sympathie voor hem kan voelen, of op z’n minst begrijpen waarom hij op deze manier door het leven gaat. Nu is hij weinig meer dan de clown die hij uithangt, en clowns worden snel vervelend.

Ik hoop dat die arme Ines de controle over haar leven weer terug heeft gekregen.

Toni Erdmann, Missing Link Films 2016

 

Parasite

132 min.

As is known by now; I’m not that impressed by lyrical reviews. If the words ‘needs an Oscar!’ pass by, I roll with my eyes. There’s two reasons I still went to go see Parasite in theaters: I was curious, and I had a free ticket.

parasite posterNow I’ve watched it and don’t know how to review it without giving the story away. But honestly, wow. Parasite moves through different genres and scores with every one of them. It doesn’t have to be a commentary about rich versus poor, about housing and loans; the images are there and clear enough.

So yes, it’s a story about a poor family that worms its way into the heart of a very rich family. Yes, you’re very probably going to have to read subtitles as well (unless you know Korean). But holy heck, what did I just watch?

It’s beautiful and sharp and cheeky, until it isn’t. It’s daunting, until it turns into something worse. It’s over two hours and only very few times that I felt like checking the time remaining, because you have to pay attention. Or rather, you want to. And in some way I feel like watching it again already – let me go back to the family.

Parasite, Neon 2019

 

 

I Am Mother

113 min.

When you first critique lands about ten minutes in, it’s hard to not view a film without bias. Why is everyone involved white, even the people in the ‘old-timey’ videos the main character views?

I Am Mother posterThen there’s the non-nuanced use of the soundtrack. A good soundtrack builds upon the scene, sharpens the emotions you are already feeling. In this case we got THINGS ARE SCARY pressed upon you while things weren’t all that scary. Or emotional. And lights flickering with no reason don’t mean that we’re worried either, just that we want an explanation about wiring suddenly being faulty when we’re looking for someone.

Is there anything nice to be said about this film? Not really – maybe that with small tweaks it could at least be a commentary on sovereign AI and its relationship with humanity, but that’s been done before – and better – as well. Even the explanation of the things happening is extremely unclear – did I nod off somewhere along the almost two hour ride?

So all in all, it’s just not much of anything. If someone’s mid-parting is the thing I’m irked about most, it doesn’t say any good about the plot. You can’t replace it with music bits either, nor flickering lights.

Good thing about all this is that at least it’s an utterly disbelieving dystopia: more sensible humans would have given up before any AI could get involved.

I Am Mother, Netflix 2019

 

The Au Pair

We have no photographs of our early days, Danny and I.

Right up my alley, this one. Family secrets, a tinge of the supernatural and people using lipstick to write on mirrors.

After a death in the family, Seraphine discovers a photograph that makes her doubt her family history. She’s always felt different (isn’t that how it always starts?), and now feels like she can finally turn that feeling into something solid.

Good thing she still lives in her family home and plenty of hints are quite easily found. Is it witches, fairies, or just the cute little villagers that had always enjoyed a good gossip about the weirdos in Summerbourne house?

We are strung along just a tad too long, but the decorations along the way are fun enough to not be very disgruntled about it. In less than 300 pages Emma Rous sets up an entertaining tent with solid poles keeping up a well-set story. If there would have been more room for the supernatural, I would have given it an extra star.

The Au Pair, Emma Rous, Penguin Random House 2018

An Ocean of Minutes

People wishing to time travel go to Houston Intercontinental Airport.

Is dystopia less scary to me when it happens in the past? For someone that doesn’t like dystopian stories, this is the second one I read in two months.

This time it’s an epidemic and time travel that gets us where we end up; although – we end up in the past. The protagonist is sent into the future from the eighties, and ends up in 1998. Oof, isn’t that an awful long time ago?

Of course, because that’s how it goes, things go quite awry, and Polly has to adjust not just to a new time, but to new surroundings and societal rules. This being a dystopian story – things didn’t improve.

The twist of this story – it masquerading as a love and time travel story, while it really isn’t – is also the most appealing feature of it. Besides that it’s too muted, lamenting and passive to feel anything but a tinge of relief of having finished this.

An Ocean of Minutes, Thea Lim, Penguin Random House 2018

The Coincidence Engine

‘They’ve found the pilot.’

I’ve owned this book for ages, and I’m pretty sure that I read it before or at least partially. Per story line my opinion fluctuated on it, and as a harsh, firm book owner, this book will be donated soon.

I’m sure both the cover as the summary will draw several eyes, though. There’s things going on, it’s science fiction without having too much science, there’s shenanigans and hijinks, and – both a pro and a con – a lot of different story lines for everyone to find something of their liking.

Because there is a young man traveling through the USA to surprise his girlfriend, but there’s also a recluse math genius, and that plane. There’s a very secret government agency, more secret-y people and a machine that might impact/ruin/improve everything.

Besides the several story lines that can make you feel so-so about this story, there’s also something strangely stilted about it. What if fewer lines would have been added, and more world-building to the rest? Why does the ending feel like the author just didn’t feel like writing any more, and should we view all this as a commentary on life, coincidences and authorities, or is that looking for something that isn’t there?

All that makes The Coincidence Engine more a collection of gimmicks than a mind-blowing, eye-opening story. Or even just full-time entertaining.

The Coincidence Engine, Sam Leith, Bloomsbury 2011

The Square

108 min.

Het is alweer bijna tien jaar geleden dat Egyptenaren Tahrir square overnamen in de hoop op een revolutie die naar een betere samenleving zou leiden. In deze documentaire wordt zichtbaar hoe dat ging, en hoe dat fout ging.

the square posterWat ook nadrukkelijk zichtbaar wordt, is wat wij hier allemaal maar aannemen als gewoon, en dat niemand van de gefilmde protesteerders om veel vragen. Men wilt geen basisinkomen, gratis elektrische auto of luxe appartement in het centrum van de stad. Nee, de Egyptenaren vragen om brood, gelijkheid, de kans om als een eervol lid van de maatschappij beschouwd te worden, in plaats van steeds maar weer omlaag getrapt te worden. Ze vragen om een einde van corruptie.

Naarmate de revolutie verloopt, zie je ook de naïviteit langzaam verdwijnen. Zó’n verenigd blok zijn de mensen ook weer niet, en sommigen kiezen de makkelijkste weg in plaats van de meest hoopvolle. Maar ook hier het punt: makkelijk oordelen vanuit onze veilige invalshoek.

Mensen zijn vermoord door de overheid die hen zou moeten beschermen, omdat ze om beter vroegen. Maar een klein beetje beter. The Square draait daar niet omheen en weigert ook andere partijen de schuld kwijt te schelden. Het is een verlammende documentaire; deze geschiedenis is nog zo recent en alweer zo ver vergeten door hen die er geen onderdeel van zijn.

‘Viva la revolucion’ wereldwijd, zolang ze maar te behappen is. Want wie weet nu hoe het tegenwoordig in Egypte is?

The Square, Netflix 2013

Fleishman is in Trouble

Toby Fleishman awoke one morning inside the city he’d lived in all his adult life and which was suddenly somehow now crawling with women who wanted him.

Good gravy, there is a lot going on here. One of those stories that pulls the rug under your feet and even while it happens, you are a bit disbelieving of the fact. I don’t even know if I liked this.

I am still thinking about it, though. About the people involved, and how important it is to have the right angle on any subject.

Which Fleishman is in trouble? Toby Fleishman is the main character – at least for a very long time. He’s divorcing his wife Rachel, and the narrator follows him in every part of his life (neatly compartmentalised): at work, as a father, as a(n almost) single man. It’s that last part that could well get on your nerves quite fast: Toby describes in detail how he feels like a kid in the candy store; the candy here being women of every shape, size and age.

But is this a story about a man’s middle life crisis, or a lament for the softer kind of man that chose children over endless riches and career promotions, and who managed to end up with a woman that did the complete opposite?

You can’t say too much about Fleishman is in Trouble without showing too much of the story, nor do I exactly know how to put its appeal into words. Maybe it’s disaster-tourism: maybe the unpleasant surprise of bad judgement.

Fleishman is in Trouble, Taffy Brodesser-Akner, Penguin Random House 2019

Ons soort Amerika

Ik heb de verkeerde kinderwagen gekocht.

Pfwa, maar weer bewijs dat je niet altijd de recensies moet geloven. Aan de andere kant: props voor de recensie die dit boek zo aantrekkelijk maakte. Net alsof niet iedereen het kan (ij .red).

Nu is elke recensie persoonlijk, hoe professioneel dan ook. Misschien was het niet meeslepend voor mij omdat ik geen witte man en vader ben, en zelf ook onderdeel van het Amerikaans dagelijks leven ben geweest. Misschien heb ik over de delen heen gelezen die ik verwachtte (lekker Amerikaanse aapjes kijken) omdat ik op den duur een beetje ‘zoned out’ raakte door weer een hoofdstuk dat begon met hem achter de kinderwagen.

Aan het einde van het boek vraagt Anton zich niet af waarom hij niet meer heeft gedaan, en ik ook. Met twee jonge kinderen is er niet de vrijheid om á la Leaving Las Vegas los te gaan in de VS, maar deze man is niet verder gekomen dan de koffiezaak.

Ik vermoed dat de ‘ons’ uit de titel de witte bevolking van Cambridge is. Wat zij van Amerika vinden – op wat wegwerpzinnen na – is na 200 pagina’s niet bepaald uitgediept.

Ons soort Amerika, Anton Stolwijk, Prometheus 2018