One of Us

95 min.

Waarom haten mannen vrouwen toch zo en zetten ze er zo vaak godsdienst voor in? Nu is de orthodoxe invulling van een geloof gelukkig (nog) de minderheid binnen een samenleving, maar toch. Zoals One of Us laat zien, geven deze mensen niet om de samenleving, alleen om hun controle er op. En ieder die niet toegeeft aan die controle, wordt bevochten.

One-of-us-posterOne of Us is een documentaire over orthodoxe Hadisic Joden in het New Yorkse Brooklyn, en dan vooral de mensen die geen onderdeel meer van ze uit willen maken. En vooral in het geval van vrouwen, kan deze orthodoxe gemeenschap hun verlies slecht nemen. Bij de afvallige mannen is er nog enige vorm van communicatie; men kijkt de andere kant uit wanneer ze heidens gedrag vertonen. Vrouwen worden bedreigd. Rechtszaken worden ingezet (op die manier mag de heidense samenleving schijnbaar wel gebruikt worden).

De documentaire geeft geen oplossingen, alleen maar een kijkje in een wereld die zo succesvol gesloten is en veel doet om dat ook vol te houden. Dat dan slachtoffers maakt, heeft een lagere prioriteit.

One of Us, Netflix 2017

The Talented Ribkins

He only came back because Melvin said he would kill him if he didn’t pay off his debt by the end of the week.

Now how to talk about this one. There’s a fantastical element in this story (several, if you consider all the individuals involved), but I definitely wouldn’t call it a story from the fantasy genre. Maybe more magic realistic? Anyway, these talents can come in quite handy, but brought ruin to almost every owner – every member of the Ribkins family.

The Ribkins are a black family, with one generation starting out as activists (during the Civil Rights Movement) but seeming to have ended up in crime. Each of their stories rub against historical facts, which makes the people with extraordinary powers trope so much more realistic, and keeps the focus on those people, instead of what they do with their powers.

This is combined with a playground (Florida) that somehow manages to make all of it more surreal and real at the same time. Of course the main character needs to dig up money he hid around the state, of course their last name has a wonderful background. Ladee Hubbard bakes all of it together, and it tastes strange, but good.

The Talented Ribkins, Ladee Hubbard, Melville House 2017

A Beautiful Work in Progress

I sat on the king bed at the Best Western Mountain View in East Ellijay, Georgia, the night before the Double Tap 50K race at Fort Mountain State Park in the Cohutta Mountains.

I expected much more pages being about running, training, exercise and the judgment people reserve for fat people doing sports. Which is kind of sloppy of me, because it says right there in the title: a memoir. And no person came out of the womb with running shoes on.

So, after my initial lack of excitement about learning about this woman I’ve never heard before and didn’t know why I should have, I kind of got over it. I’m interested in what she had to say about her (long distance) runs, we’ll take the rest as it comes.

With Mirna Valerio being a fat collection of minorities in contemporary USA, there’s so much more to her stories about running and exercising than the regular blood, sweet, and tears (although they do show up). This might make you a bit impatient about the next story about a trial run, but it also shows you that nothing happens in a vacuum; not even exercising and sports.

So, for that, you could read this memoir. And, honestly, there’s definitely different kinds of motivation in it. You just have to work a bit harder for it. If not – there’s plenty of ‘regular’ running stories to be found.

A Beautiful Work in Progress; A Memoir, Mirna Valerio, Grand Harbor Press 2017

The Feels

90 min.

Na Duckbutter was ik weer voorzichtig om nog een ‘wlw’ (women loving women) film uit te kiezen, maar iets met ezels. Of volharding, want er moeten toch lieve romances met vrouwen zijn gemaakt de afgelopen twintig jaar.

The Feels posterThe Feels begint in ieder geval al met een luchtiger element: tijdens een vrijgezellenfeest komt men er achter dat één van de twee verloofden nog nooit een orgasme heeft gehad. Haha, seksgrapjes! Alleen heeft ene verloofde al die tijd wel gedaan alsof seks orgasmes opleverde dus ineens …iets minder grappig, want hoe moet je daar mee omgaan als je dat net voor je bruiloft te horen krijgt?

Het komische deel komt dan ook van de mensen om het stel heen, plus het soort grapjes-uit-ongemak waar vrouwen een alleenrecht op lijken te hebben. Gooi er twee mensen bij die standaard het verkeerde zeggen en je hebt een verzameling van ‘ai, oeps’.

De charmes van dit filmpje komen dan ook vanaf de vreemde figuren die hier verzameld zijn én dat ze zichzelf mogen ontwikkelen naar (enig) zelfinzicht. En dat lukt ze nog ook zonder een excessieve hoeveelheid van letterlijk blootgeven.

Ik blijf zoeken.

The Feels, Netflix 2017

 

Stay with Me

I must leave this city today and come to you.

I typed and deleted the start of this blog for about four times. It’s an impressive story, a frustrating one, not a happy one but a hopeful one? Here’s me scoring high on cliché bingo.

So, okay. Stay with Me is about a Nigerian couple that can’t conceive and because offspring is very important, is offered (‘offered’) a second wife to make sure offspring does happen. But this is liking saying Lord of the Rings is about some rings, there’s much more to it.

It’s not just a slice of life, it’s a slice of culture. It’s for everyone who isn’t familiar with Nigeria and Nigerians, a look behind the scenes. Yes, we all have relationships and romances, but how, why, and in what way? What sacrifices are desired (by the partners, their families, their surroundings), and who are you if you’re not parents of a child/children?

I was warned beforehand that the subject could get pretty heavy, and there have been times I cursed out outdated ideas and the people still clinging to them. But as an anthropological view, as a psychological view, and to freaking root for Yejide.. this story has a strong pull.

Stay with Me, Ayobami Adebayo, Alfred A. Knopf 2017

4 3 2 1

According to family legend, Ferguson’s grandfather departed on foot from his native city of Minsk with one hundred rubles sewn into the lining of his jacket, traveled west to Hamburg through Warsaw and Berlin, and the booked passage on a ship called the Empress of China, which crossed the Atlantic in rough winter storms and sailed into New York Harbor on the first day of the twentieth century.

The amount of times I thought ‘this would have been more interesting with a female protagonist’ was more than ten. The amount of times I wondered if Paul Auster has any kind of editing team or editor is even higher. Seriously mate, if you need fifteen-plus item lists to get to almost 900 pages, consider aiming a bit lower in page number.

Oh, and definitely change that ending.

What did I like about this story about a young Jewish boy growing up in fifties – sixties – seventies’ USA? Well, it’s one big ‘What if’ story. Every chapter starts with a new Ferguson, but some of them die, some of them grow up to be sterile, some have parents that divorce, some get into accidents. And Paul Auster shows the impact of all these internal and external factors on a human life.

But besides that, he shares a visual description of every woman in the boy’s life, and of every sexual encounter and masturbation session. And then there’s the lists.

If I’d be more aggressive about this time wasted, I’d create an abbreviated version of this book; instead I just want more ‘What if’-stories that won’t repeatedly tell me about a boy’s first erection.

4 3 2 1, Paul Auster, Faber & Faber 2017

Before We Were Yours

My story begins on a sweltering August night, in a place I will never set eyes upon.

Adoption isn’t an easy subject, but the historical story line of Before We Were Yours shows at the very least how it definitely shouldn’t be handled.

There are two story tellers in this novel about an “orphanage” that basically stole children from poor people and sold them to rich families. One is the girl and her siblings that go through it, the other connected to her through different generations. This element sometimes makes it a little bit Lifetime-ish, although her motivations for discovering more are at first more political than personal. ie the sob story starts later into the story.

Weaved in between these two is a romance that isn’t quite necessary, but not horribly done either. I feel like the subject is what elevates this novel from being just another one of the paperbacks your gran reads and pushes upon you because it’s “so exciting”. It’s an easy, accessible read, but the horror of the “orphanage” and the reality on which its based, is what gives the story its pull.

Before We Were Yours, Lisa Wingate, Penguin Random House LLC 2017

Ali’s Wedding

110 min.

Did I watch this before, or is the story just too familiar? Which would be sad, because why are multiple people in the twenty-first century still telling their children which career and which life partner to pick?

Alis Wedding imdbThis story is based on real life events, with the author playing the male lead – and I guess originator of the confusion created by lying. First he lies about getting into medicine (he doesn’t), then ends up engaged to someone he doesn’t want to be engaged to, and then there’s the temporary marriage to someone else. Oh, and being banned from the USA for a play, but that might have been the result of the man’s honesty.

All this might make it sound like a comedy of errors, but underneath always runs the line of being stuck between cultures. Ali’s Iraqi in Australia, and no matter how much his father knows about many things; he doesn’t understand that his son doesn’t want to become a doctor and doesn’t want an arranged marriage. He’s not the only one suffering, and the film gives a bit of room to others to show so.

This time, there’s a happy ending (in a way), but this film might serve as a reminder that there’s plenty people stuck, and that some things can’t be solved by musicals in mosques (honestly, does that happen? The more you know).

Ali’s Wedding, Netflix 2017

 

 

Het achtste leven (voor Brilka)

Eigenlijk heeft dit verhaal meer dan één begin.

Is het te vroeg in het jaar om te zeggen dat ik mijn beste boek van 2019 heb gelezen? Want oef, dit is een boek zoals je het wilt hebben, dat je het niet weg kunt leggen, dat het stukjes in jezelf raakt waarvan je niet eens af wist (of af wilt weten). Tegelijkertijd begrijp ik dat dit gigantisch persoonlijk is, hoe een boek je aanspreekt.

Dus raad ik dit boek aan voor de mensen die van familie ‘epics’ houden: verhalen die decennia overbruggen binnen één familie. Het boek is ook voor mensen die in geschiedenis geïnteresseerd zijn: een heel groot deel van het boek speelt zich af in twintigste-eeuws Sovjet plus Georgië (dat natuurlijk ook om de zoveel tijd onder de Sovjet viel).

En dan kan ik het ook nog aanraden omdat alle hoofdpersonen vrouwen zijn. Ja, niet de vriendelijkste, vrolijkste types, en ze maken ook dingen mee die je geen mens toewenst. Maar als je eenmaal begint, is het moeilijk stoppen. Het achtste leven is voor Brilka, al die anderen zijn voor de lezer.

Het achtste leven (voor Brilka), Nino Haratischwili, Atlas Contact 2017

Coco

109 min.

Is de kerstvakantie compleet zonder een animatiefilm? Voor hen die dat ook voelen: Coco nu op Netflix te vinden.

coco_2017The Book of Life deed het al een paar jaar geleden: Dia de Muertos gebruiken. Deze keer komt Miguel in het land der doden terecht omdat hij zijn familie probeert te ontsnappen (zij haten muziek, hij wilt alleen maar muziek maken), en ontdekt daar dingen over zichzelf en zijn familie. Zoals dat gaat.

Het ziet er allemaal weer heel mooi uit (zeker aan de dode kant), en enkele keren lijkt het zelfs meer dan het standaard plastic randje dat elke grote animatiestudio zo graag schijnt te gebruiken. Waarom heb ik alleen weer het gevoel dat Disney waar voor je geld wilt leveren, en de film weer net iets te lang is? Op deze manier wordt het tempo uit het verhaal gehaald, waardoor het meer een gevalletje ‘Oh wat mooi’ wordt in plaats van ‘Oh wat emotioneel/spannend/gaaf’.

Aan de andere kant; ruimte voor een plaspauze – zeker als je het met jongere kinderen en/of veel drankjes kijkt – is nooit weg.

Coco, Disney 2017