Empire of Wild

Old medicine has a way of being remembered, of haunting the land where it was laid.

I like the work of this author – all two books I’ve read by her. Not just because she writes about Canada and a Canada I know little about (of indigenous people), but there is something lush about her writing style. Organic, flowing. And yes, using those clichés makes me feel a little bit iffy.

Empire of Wild uses indigenous stories and mythology again, again in a contemporary (bit less apocalyptic) setting. A lost man is found again, but doesn’t recognise his wife nor their life together. Something wolf-like skulks around. White people threaten the land.

You could call it magic-realistic, but somehow it feels too down to earth for it. These people are so used to living the way they do with the stories they know, that adding whispering winds or lounging ghosts would make things silly instead of magical.

Honestly, I’m just curious to what Cherie Dimaline does next. We’ve had post-apocalyptic and contemporary. Something from the (distant) past?

Empire of Wild, Cherie Dimaline, Random House Canada 2019

Frontera verde

8 x 45 min.

Elk jaar neem ik mij voor om vaker TV-series te bloggen, en elk jaar vergeet ik het een beetje. Frontera verde is een Columbiaanse serie die Netflix ‘limited’ noemt dus misschien dat het bij één seizoen blijft. Als je naar het einde van de laatste aflevering kijkt … wie weet.

frontera verde posterMaar waar gaat het over? In den beginne is het een detective: er worden lijken gevonden in de jungle en een detective wordt vanuit Bogota er heen gestuurd om dat even snel op te lossen.

Maar maar dan (spannend trommelgeroffel)! Zijn er bovennatuurlijke elementen of zijn het hallucinerende middelen, kloppen de tijden nog wel, en wie is die vreemde vrouw?

Het is geen heel toegankelijke serie: sommige verhaallijnen meanderen iets te veel en de hoofdpersoon is ook nog makkelijk te waarderen/steunen. Door het heen en weer-gespring van verhaal- en tijdlijnen moet je ook je aandacht er bij houden. Aan de andere kant zorgt dit wel voor een andere ervaring van iets moois en ongemakkelijks en meer groen dan de willekeurige stadsinwoner per maand mee krijgt. Het is – om het heel naar te zeggen – een ervaring.

En wat er nu aan de hand is met die moorden? Och, ondergeschikt aan de rest.

Frontera verde, Netflix 2019

There Will Come a Darkness

In the moonlit room overlooking the city of faith, a priest knelt before Ephyra and begged for his life.

Am I going to say it? I’m going to say it. This is another ‘I thought this would be a stand-alone fantasy YA’ failure on my part. Of COURSE it’s part of a series, rookie mistake!

The nice thing is that you don’t really notice until it’s too late. The question of ‘how is this going to be cleanly rolled up in so little pages left’ doesn’t show up until 3/4 into the book, and even then Katy Rose Pool doesn’t use neon-light warnings to guide you to the open ending. The ending isn’t even that open, which to me – avid hater of open endings – is a relief.

Except for the ages of the protagonists, it’s not very YA either (little romance, little teen-specific issues) and the fantasy part delivers. Scary cult, people with gifts, threatening apocalypse, royals et cetera. The world-building makes you wonder if this is supposed to be our past or our distance future: just look at the map used.

With five protagonists it sometimes feels a bit like some get more time in the spotlight than others; it also makes it easy to quickly get a preference. Maybe in the next book(s) the attention will shifts and you might feel more for other characters.

All in all, a nothing-wrong-with fantasy. If I’d see the sequel in the library, I wouldn’t ignore it.

There Will Come a Darkness, Katy Rose Pool, MacMillan 2019

Ducks, Newburyport

I can’t give you the first sentence of this book, because that sentence takes approximately 35 pages to finish. Does it even ever finish, or is it just paused by another story line that does use other punctuation than commas?

I didn’t finish this book either. I read a lot of the pages, I read the last few but I didn’t read the majority of the almost 1000 pages.

The majority of those 1000 pages are a stream of conscious about an American housewife that bakes pies. After about two-third of the book there are layers added, issues, maybe even traumas that can help you understand the endless circling of her thoughts, but by then I had long checked out. The blurb on the cover ‘Ulysses got nothing on this’ should have warned me; I thought it was just about the size of the book. No, it was about the run-on-sentence.

I appreciate how the author and the publisher (there’s a page in the back explaining things and how they want to support original stories) wanted to offer something different, and maybe I’m just too anxious and too much of a control freak to appreciate this.

So, if someone read it or will read it, I’d love to get a summary about what’s going on, because I gave up the fight.

Ducks, Newburyport, Lucy Ellman 2019

Invisible Women

Most of recorded human history is one big data gap.

Good gravy, just when you thought you already knew, things turn out to be so much worse. Next to a sexist gap in pay, safety and health there is a huge one in the thing that drives pretty  much all of society: data.

Why is the default ‘he’? Why is there still a riddle about a doctor whose husband died, and why do too many people involved with design viewing women as ‘men with boobs’? Well, because societies worldwide have made it so, and not enough people in powerful positions protest it. And it turns out to be lethal for women.

Invisible Women isn’t particularly uplifting material: there’s just so many numbers and anecdotes on things that went wrong and are going wrong and men not giving a damn about it. How do we rally for change when the entire history of humanity is against us?

Because in some cases and in some countries things have changed and are changing. And you can never change something you don’t know anything about. And because it might save your life to know.

Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men, Caroline Criado Perez, Abrams Press 2019

On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous

Let me begin again.

Golly gosh, how to explain this? It’s a memoir, it’s a fever dream, it’s an obituary – maybe? And did I like all of it, any of it, only the parts that I read at night? It was, in a way, beautiful, though. A kind of experience hard to put into words.

On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous is one of those titles that seem to be singing around in ‘Serious Reader’ circles for a while. It’s not loud enough to feel like it’s been hyped, nor is a celebrity book club attached, but there is the vibe of “Haven’t you read it yet?” around it. To me, anyway.

Ocean Vuong wrote poetry before, and it shows in his descriptions, his look on life, how it feels like he weighed every word before putting it down. It’s in juxtaposition with the subjects he writes down: the suffering of his grandmother and mother, the lack of family, being an immigrant child, being the only different one while growing up. All of it feels absolutely anchor-less.

Can you have an opinion about something that runs through your mind like sand through your hands? I’m sure you can, but I’m just going to stick with ‘an experience’ and a weird feeling of honour that Vuong allowed you in.

On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous, Ocean Vuong, Penguin Random House 2019

How to Hack a Heartbreak

Never trust anything you read on the internet.

First romantic comedy of the year! Although both genres are just slightly represented; How to Hack a Heartbreak is mostly about being a woman in the tech world, and about dating online. The comedy is a tad sharper than you might expect, but both these subjects deserve some attention that isn’t just tongue-in-cheek.

That doesn’t mean that How to is a severe novel about the endless sexism both these worlds entail and a detailed deconstruction of it – it’s still a romantic novel after all. Still, the more realistic angle on the subject and of the protagonist’s thinking is pretty refreshing.

It makes the story of Melanie learning something about herself, her abilities and her (lack of) self-confidence easier to swallow. There might have been just one or two situations through which I rolled my eyes, and I’m pretty sure that was an expected reaction. All this, and a well-balanced happy ending, makes this a romance for the ’20s.

How to Hack a Heartbreak, Kirstin Rockaway, Harlequin 2019

Ninguém Tá Olhando

8 x 25

Netflix biedt het aan als Nobody’s Looking, maar op deze manier weet je tenminste gelijk dat het ondertiteling lezen wordt.

nobody's looking netflixDeze korte serie (ik keek ‘m in een avond en kon nog om tien uur naar bed) gaat over een bureau van beschermengelen waarin een nieuwe aanwinst redelijk snel elke aanwezige regel overtreedt en er nogal een zooitje van maakt. Voordeel van deze serie is dat er ook niet veel meer aan het plot is: niet meerdere plotlijnen die door elkaar lopen en in het niets verdwijnen – dit is gewoon wat er aan de hand is. En dat is vermakelijk.

Tussendoor zijn er nog kleine steekjes onder water over hoe vreemd en kwetsbaar mensen zijn, maar zelfs beschermengelen accepteren dingen ‘omdat het nu eenmaal zo is’, dus zoveel pijn doen die steekjes niet.

En, als roodharige, is het grappig om eens niet de zielloze maar juist de brave hendrik te zijn. Al lijkt het bij sommige beschermengelen wel alsof het niet hun natuurlijke haarkleur is …

Nobody’s Looking, Netflix 2019

 

Een bedroefde God

Toen hij door de Veverístraat liep, moest hij denken aan tante Hrbácková.

Extra tekens niet toegevoegd, excuses aan de Tsjechische taal. Na Het achtste leven (voor Brilka) had ik een honger voor meer Oost-Europese verhalen; natuurlijk is dat een grote paraplu maar het is een nieuwe invalshoek die ik graag invul.

Niks tegen Kratochvil, maar dit was niet de volgende Het achtste leven. Ten eerste was het verhaal stukken korter en waren er minder personages: soort van twee, maar eigenlijk maar eentje. Het draait om familie, maar de familie is vooral een tegenstander; geen onderdeel van het verhaal.

Buitenom het plot van (licht-)criminele familie die de hoofdpersoon vooral wilt ontwijken, is er ruimte voor de stad waar het verhaal zich grotendeels in afspeelt: Brno. Parijs – voor een uitstapje – wordt ook op zo’n manier weggezet dat ze bijna meer de aandacht vragen dan het plot.

De schrijfstijl is stug en de hoofdpersoon lijkt ook niet enthousiast om zijn leven en gedachtes te delen. Hierdoor kreeg ik het gevoel dat het een koud boekje is, een kort verhaal uit een bundel die alle Tsjechische verhalen bevat, maar ik die net kwijt ben geraakt.

De begeleidende tekst vertelt dat de auteur graag op verschillende niveaus verwart. Dat is hem in ieder geval gelukt.

Een bedroefde God, Jirí Kratochvil, Uitgeverij Kleine Uil 2019

Charlie’s Angels

119 min.

Soms werkt de mond-tot-mond de verkeerde kant op: men was zo luid over hoe stom en saai en onnodig deze film was, dat ik er heen ging met ‘Moh, het is toch gratis en ik heb al popcorn gekocht’. Verdikkeme, bleek mijn mening af te wijken van hen die er zo luid over waren geweest!

poster Charlie AngelsSowieso, wanneer is een film ‘nodig’? Waarom zijn er straks wel acht Mission: Impossible-films maar mag Charlie’s Angels maar vier keer (dit getal schud ik zo uit m’n mouw)? Als je weet waar ik graag op let in films, weet je het antwoord wel.

Charlie’s Angels in 2019 heeft iets meer diversiteit in de cast en laat duidelijk zien hoe de organisatie werkt. Er zijn gadgets maar niet ongeloofwaardige, de actie is stoer maar niet overdreven en bijna altijd geloofwaardig, een paar twistjes zorgen dat het tempo hoog blijft en de drie hoofdpersonen werken leuk samen. Eigenlijk is dit een actiefilm zoals ik ze miste: niet te veel van alles en makkelijk te verwerken.

Natuurlijk – het had grappiger, scherper, iets korter en iets verdiepender gekund: wat weten we nu echt van deze drie. Maar het is een actiefilm. Ik voelde al opluchting dat er eindelijk eentje is die niet de ‘hoe lang kan een actiescène duren en hoeveel bloed kunnen we er in kwijt’-uitdaging aannam.

Kortgezegd: best lekker voor als je wel de actie, maar niet het hypergeweldadige en zeer ongeloofwaardige wilt.

Charlie’s Angels, Columbia Pictures 2019