Lady Bird

95 min.

Ik heb een wantrouwende inborst: als iets het allerbeste ooit is en zó herkenbaar, mag men mijn portie aan fikkie geven. Is er de mogelijkheid om de portie gratis tot mij te nemen …vooruit, ik ben Hollandser dan wantrouwende.

Ladybird posterEn zo keek ik Lady Bird, een film die zó herkenbaar zou zijn voor elke tiener (die in de jaren negentig was opgegroeid) en met verschillende prijzen werd beloond. Was het herkenbaar? Soms, de rest werd beïnvloed door de omgeving (Californië).

Wat de film vooral een klein beetje boven het maaiveld uit laat steken, is Saoirse Ronan. Goed in alles wat ze doet, en krijgt het nu dus ook weer voor elkaar om de kijker het haar te gunnen, d’r een tik te willen geven, maar vooral te zien hoe vast ze zit in pubertijd, zichzelf en haar omgeving.

Zo kabbelt het allemaal door, gelukkig ook eens zonder toevoegingen die sommige films noodzakelijk vinden om drama te creëren. Ronan mag spelen wat ze kan, en ook zonder herkenning is het een fijn filmpje.

Lady Bird, Entertainment 360 2017

 

Hunt for the Wilderpeople

101 min.

De film is indrukwekkend Nieuw-Zeelands, en niet alleen door de omgeving en de humor. Misschien is het omdat ik het herken, misschien is het omdat ik ander werk van de regisseur heb gezien (Thor: Ragnarok, What We Do in the Shadows). Hoe dan ook, het is ‘indie’ maar dan nog net een beetje anders. Droger, waarschijnlijk.

hunt for the wilderpeople posterTerwijl het onderwerp van de film het makkelijk een slopende tranentrekker had kunnen maken. Een pleegkind krijgt een laatste kans; op een klein boerderijtje in de middle of nowhere. Hij is een ongemakkelijke puber, maar zijn pleegmoeder breekt er snel doorheen. Zijn pleegvader niet.

Laat dat nu degene zijn waarmee hij vandoor gaat om te voorkomen dat hij de jeugdgevangenis in moet.

Een groot deel van de film speelt zich af in de wildernis, met maar twee acteurs, maar door tempo en dialoog wordt het geen moment rustig. Beiden komen uit hun schulp omdat het wel moet, hoe pijnlijk het ook is.

En zo klopt van begin tot einde een hart in deze film. Met af en toe zulke gortdroge momenten dat dat hart even de hik krijgt.

Hunt for the Wilderpeople, Piki Films 2016

Who’s That Girl?

Life through a phone is a lie.
It always feels a bit like betrayal, when I call chick lit/romance smart because it so easily implies that all books in this genre are dumb, drab or both. I don’t like the term chick lit for starters anyway, why is it called ‘slice of life’ or ‘coming of age’ for men but for us again cut down to ‘chick’ and ‘lit’? I’ve never met a woman that called herself (unironically) chick. But this is a side note.
Who’s That Girl? has a premise that made groan a bit; the main character allows the groom to kiss her on his wedding day and she flees the absolute mayhem that follows. All that, and it needs almost 500 pages? Honestly, I can’t even remember why I took this book from the library, but I’m glad I did. Because Mhairi McFarlane shows oh so realistically how the victim is blamed, how bullying isn’t just something for (high) school and that it’s easy to outrace yourself and your needs without really noticing it. So Who’s That Girl? is definitely a coming of age, lessons learned book for the thirty-something woman.
Besides all that, it’s fun. It’s heartfelt, whatever Edie does and tries, especially when she starts adjusting to being back in Nottingham (having fled there), connecting with her family and neighbours (in a way), and finding satisfaction from work (ghostwriting the biography of an actor). She tries and she stumbles but it never looks like it happens For The Plot or as filler. Okay, of course there’s some stuff that will make you harumpf in (embarrassed) disbelief, but none of it feels quirky because it has to be quirky. Honestly, if this can happen when you’re half way into your thirties, I’m looking forward to it.
Who’s That Girl?, Mhairi McFarlane, Harper Collins 2016

The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Once upon a time a girl named September had a secret.

It was the first title I recognised in the endless collection that is Overdrive. It’s also the sequel to The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland In A Ship Of Her Own Making, because who needs short titles anyway (it’s not like Valente can’t do it, see Radiance).

Again, she offers a world brimming with colours, weirdness and smart little thoughts you wonder how you didn’t come up with them yourself. It’s fairy tales as they once were, yet with a Pratchettesque humor: don’t take the story teller, nor the experiences at face value.

Things went bad (again), and September is up to fixing it (again). She’s around after all. This time it’s in Fairyland (Below), making things a bit darker, including September. Small pieces of (ugly) reality meander through the adventures/quests/September’s wanderings.

Because even if you can survive the Forgotful Sea, you’re still someone’s child.

The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There, Catherynne M. Valente, Macmillan 2012

Hotel Transylvania 2

89 min.

Hotel_Transylvania_2_Theatrical_PosterIk weet het, waarom kijk je nou niet zo’n film met oogkleppen op? Sorry, dat gaat steeds lastiger. Trouwt de vrouwelijke hoofdrolspeler nu echt op haar achttiende? Is ze zwanger en moeder op haar negentiende/twintigste? Waarom heeft ze nog steeds hetzelfde aan als toen ze een tiener was? Waarom heeft de love interest/echtgenoot helemaal geen aantrekkelijke kwaliteiten en gedraagt hij zich als volwassene nog als tiener? Waarom kan vader/grootvader niet eerlijk zijn tegen zijn dochter, in plaats van liegen en zijn kleinzoon in gevaar brengen door zijn ouderwetse ideeën?

Maar hé, de vrouwelijke karakters zijn deze keer niet alleen vrouw/vriendin van, er is één stoer skate-meisje.

Het blijft een vermakelijk element, dat wel. Hotel vol monsters dat mensen moet dulden, flauwe grapjes over clichés over die monsters. Jammer dat er niet net iets meer aandacht besteed kon worden aan de vrouwelijke kant van het verhaal. En had sowieso die tijdsprong groter gemaakt; welke vampier wil nu zwanger zijn als tiener?

Hotel Transylvania 2, Columbia Pictures 2015

Penelope

In the July before school started, Penelope Davis O’Shaunessy, an incoming Harvard freshman of average height and lank hair, filled out a survey about what type of roommate she was looking for.

Who recommended this to me? When? Where and how did I find it and felt like I absolutely had to read this? Yes, this is another one of the To Read list. And while I’m pretty sure I enjoyed it, I wouldn’t know if I would recommend it.

You see, everyone involved in this story is annoying, awkward, embarrassing, cloyingly sweet, a fool or all of the above at the same time. It was full of recognizable thoughts and situations, and it probably depends on the age and mindset of the reader to motherhen-ish cluck over these poor fools or grow incredibly frustrated by them. I swapped between both on quite a regular basis.

Penelope is a freshman, an asocial one with no clue about her place in the world, how social interaction and other people work. She tries, because her mother wants it and because she doesn’t understand how it can be so tasking if so many manage. But even when trying, she floats, she stumbles, she’s a wallflower of existence.

That makes the story weird and uncomfortable and sometimes really funny. Does Penelope need a kick in the ass, a hug, or both? Will she grow out of it or do adults like her exist? It’s like fairytale on humanity: these oddballs are here.

Penelope, Rebecca Harrington, Vintage Books 2012

 

Dora: A Headcase

Mother is cleaning the spoons again.

“A female fightclub”, “Hopefully to replace Catcher in the Rye in reading lists for the alienated” and an introduction from Chuck Palahniuk – I was very curious about why the heck I had added this book to my To Read list.

While reading the question returned to me on a regular basis, because this isn’t a fun, accessible book. Yet finishing it, I noticed that I’m glad I did. That I took thoughts and ideas and silent hopes of the teens involved into the world with me. Maybe I didn’t like it, but it definitely left me something. Which I think everyone needs with a book from time to time.

Dora is Ida, a girl in love, a daughter off parents that seem not to care or not to be able to function as parents, a psychiatrist’s client. She’s angry and prickly and – a teenager; so of course oh so smart and intelligent and with a clear view of how the world really works. Was she a passive element in one of Freud’s case studies: this time everything but her and her friends seem to be inactive, passive elements in a slow motion world.

Some heart comes from Ida’s friends, but mostly it’s a pool of tar covered in glass shards. Yes, it should replace Catcher, maybe for the sole reason to show that girls can be broken and angry and frustrated with the world as well, while still gain wings to fly through it.

Dora: A Headcase, Lidia Yuknavitch, Hawthorne Books & Literary Arts 2012