The Hidden Oracle

Hoodlums punch my face
I would smite them if I could
Mortality blows

Looks like I’m on a bit of a fantasy kick these past (two) months; good thing it can be such an impressively versatile genre.

Rick Riordan is quite a familiar name in the genre, within the subgenre of YA. There’s been two movies, there’s plenty of books that brought Greek mythology to teens. Literally and figuratively.

This time it’s about – yep, right there in the title – Apollo. The god is turned human, but that doesn’t mean things go along breezily. Quests, monsters, demigods! And meeting your offspring.

Yes, the tongue is firmly in the cheek, but Riordan still manages to pass some mythology facts along. It’s all in seemingly effortless fun, and the twist might even surprise you. And if you’re looking at a way in for both reading and/or learning about Greek mythology, this and Riordan’s other work is a super accessible first step.

The Trials of Apollo: The Hidden Oracle, Rick Riordan, Hyperion 2016

Hero

I never thought I’d have a story worth telling, at least not one about me.

Another amazing YA. Without a love triangle, a special snowflake or vampires. Hilarious, lovely and nearly perfect (in its genre/kind/and so on. No such thing as The One Perfect Book in my world).

Thom Creed is the son of Hal Creed, used-to-be superhero but now, after a horrible disaster, a social pariah. Thom is kind of ordinary, until several things happen at the same time. He owns up to himself that he has superpowers, a thing his father hates, so he has to keep them a secret. The Superhero League wants him to try out for their club. During a basketball match an opponent outs him as gay, which makes society turn against him. He needs to save the world and his invisible mother (literally) pops up after years of being absent. It’s a lot to handle.

But Moore manages it very well. After you close the book after 500+ pages, there are only two or three plot lines that you have to roll up by yourself, everything else is neatly tied up. Before that there’s love, loss, redemption, teenager problems and playful parodying of everything superhero.

I want a sequel, I want a film, I want people to read it and enjoy it as I did.

Hero, Perry Moore, Hyperion 2007