The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Once upon a time a girl named September had a secret.

It was the first title I recognised in the endless collection that is Overdrive. It’s also the sequel to The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland In A Ship Of Her Own Making, because who needs short titles anyway (it’s not like Valente can’t do it, see Radiance).

Again, she offers a world brimming with colours, weirdness and smart little thoughts you wonder how you didn’t come up with them yourself. It’s fairy tales as they once were, yet with a Pratchettesque humor: don’t take the story teller, nor the experiences at face value.

Things went bad (again), and September is up to fixing it (again). She’s around after all. This time it’s in Fairyland (Below), making things a bit darker, including September. Small pieces of (ugly) reality meander through the adventures/quests/September’s wanderings.

Because even if you can survive the Forgotful Sea, you’re still someone’s child.

The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There, Catherynne M. Valente, Macmillan 2012

Acts of Violence

It begins in a parking lot.

Humans can be so very ugly in thoughts, behavior and actions. This story plays out in the sixties – seventies of the previous century, but show that the ideas and life styles mentioned sadly aren’t outdated. The corrupt cop that abuses his power, the people that look away because “someone else will help”, the racism, the sexism.

A woman is murdered a few meters away from her home, in front of her apartment block and a lot of its inhabitants. Some see it from begin to end, some are distracted by what’s going on inside their own homes. And all of them quickly go from shock to denial to passing responsibility to the other.

Every chapter is for one of the inhabitants remotely involved. Some know the woman well, others are more worried about the violence on their door step. It’s the cop, the murderer, the neighbor, and all have motives and blame-the-other/blame-the-world arguments to keep the self denial (or delusion) strongly in place.

It’s not a happy story, and your faith in humanity won’t be restored by the end. It is a clear cut showcase of the human character when threatened.

Acts of Violence, Ryan David Jahn, MacMillan 2009

Jane Austen Stole My Boyfriend

‘I hate Jane Austen!

Cutesy. This could be called fan fiction for everything Jane Austen wrote, but it doesn’t (after a while) feel like a cheap rip off. Main character is Jenny, a cousin of Jane. We follow her through her diary entries.

Just like in Austen’s stories, life in a certain society and commentary upon it, is what’s the meat of the novel. Parties and marriages (for love or for money), fantasies about adventures and a lot of men. Jenny wants to marry Captain Williams, but her older brother and sister-in-law (the very clear bad guy of this story) waylay her plans.

Jane Austen Stole My Boyfriend is colourful and shiny and feels like Jane Austen for (pre-)teens. A step up to start on one of the in the book mentioned stories by Austen.

Jane Austen Stole My Boyfriend – A Secret Diary, Cora Harrison, Macmillan 2011