Young Adult

94 min.

Diablo Cody/Charlize Theron sandwich! Waar Tully juist meer dan verwacht was, had ik hier wél ‘Juno voor volwassenen’ verwacht. Maar deze keer was het weer stukken menselijker in plaats van een bingokaart van superscherpe leuke opmerkingen. Sommige schrijvers kunnen dus wel groeien. young-adult-poster

‘Volwassen’ is in is het geval van hoofdpersoon Mavis zeer ruim toe te passen. Ze vond haar middelbare schooltijd haar hoogtepunt en verdient genoeg geld om niet aangepast mee te draaien in de ‘gewone’ samenleving. Door een uitnodiging komt ze weer terecht in het dorp van het jeugd en gedraagt zich daar dan ook naar. Inclusief het claimen van een vriendje, dat tegenwoordig wel een getrouwde vader is.

Mavis is vervelend, maar altijd net op het randje van meelijwekkend. Kan iemand d’r een tik geven, kan iemand haar helpen.

Dus deze keer ook weer geen wahahaha-comedy, maar een wijze les die met veel ongemak je onder de neus gewreven wordt. Hoop nu maar dat dat hoogtepunt nog komt, echt waar.

Young Adult, Paramount Pictures 2011

10 Cloverfield Lane

106 min.

I don’t watch a lot of thrillers, definitely not those involving aliens because I really don’t like aliens (I’m sorry, aliens). This movie – like The Invitation – was sold to me as ‘just scary, not gross’, and because I have the human need to be scared by (outrageous) things, 10_Cloverfield_Lane posterI added this to my Netflix list. I was promised very little aliens as well.

10 Cloverfield Lane uses one of my favourite tropes for horror/thriller/scary stuff: are humans not the worst monsters?

Michelle is in a car crash and wakes up in a bunker. The owner of the bunker says it’s for her own sake, because something bad happened outside, but isn’t particularly sharing about what this badness is. Instead, he seems to care more about her fitting into the image of what life in the bunker should be.

It’s easy to say too much, so I’ll stick with ‘Is he being a scary mean guy for a reason, or just because he is a scary mean guy?’. The movie balances nicely between those options, and after finishing it you may find yourself thinking that the other option would have been better.

10 Cloverfield Lane, Paramount Pictures 2016

Star Trek Beyond

122 min.

It was definitely better than the second movie, but how hard was that one to beat? This time we’re back to the feeling of a summery, no-need-for-life-lessons Star Trek. And even star-trek-beyond-posterthough the director came from the Fast and the Furious series, not that much races.

As usual, the Enterprise is off somewhere, trying to help out an alien race, when they find someone that needs their help somewhere else. Being good Federation crew, they follow. A villain needs to be added in somewhere, so guess in which ways things don’t go as they should.

This time the movie moves along much smoother, there is less lens flare and random female nudity and flat-falling jokes. It could still do with more speaking parts for women, and it’s sad that a same-sex kiss had to be cut out. But if it’s going to be a trilogy, we leave on a semi high note, else the only way is up.

Star Trek Beyond, Paramount Pictures 2016

True Grit

110 min.

I think I liked this one a little bit more than The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. Not just because it was shorter but it was a little bit less ..bearing on you. Where The Assassination wants you to be clear that there is no such thing as heroes, wrong or right, stalking is never good and so on – it pushes more to form an opinion. True Grit is a lot more … ‘simply there’.

Paramount Pictures 2010
Paramount Pictures 2010

That’s not because there happens less. Here are also shoot outs, needless deaths and gorgeous surroundings. And main character Mattie Ross (a thirteen year old girl whom decides to hunt down her father’s killer) is much stronger and level-headed than Robert Ford. Mattie knows her business, is smart and unimpressed by adults (fooling around). There are only very few shots in which she’s denigrated to plot device, a sudden question asked in a too childish voice to help the clueless viewers along. Which really isn’t necessary in my opinion, especially because with Jeff Bridges’ accent (the Marshall that helps her) you wouldn’t understand the answer anyway. His Marshall really needs subtitles from time to time.

True Grit is a little bit lighter, mostly due to its characters (as its surroundings are covered in the bleakness that seems to come with westerns). The Marshall is the gruff with the golden heart, LaBoeuf is flamboyant but honest, the bad guys are stinky rats and Mattie could be a role model for a lot of children, boys and girls alike. The good thing about Hailee Steinfeld’s acting is that you never get the ‘Ugh, child-actor’ feeling. Mattie’s snappy remarks fit her, as do her sudden tears.

Western isn’t a genre I’m well-versed in (before these two films only having watched The Quick and The Dead) and I don’t know if it completely fits me. I do know that I want to see more of Mattie’s story. Luckily there’s a comic for that.

True Grit, Paramount Pictures 2010